Alzheimer’s Care

alzheimers_careMany seniors will need special care in light of having been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and other memory issues. Seniors afflicted with memory affliction should be thoroughly examined by a medical doctor in order to determine the senior’s stage of affliction. Knowing whether the senior is affected with early, middle or late stage affliction will allow for a better determination on what type of facility is best suited for a senior.

Early stages of memory loss may require only limited assistance with daily personal needs. Whereas those with more advanced stages of memory loss will require more intense care such as needing assistance with walking, eating and medical care. Whatever the level of care necessary, it is important to match the level provided by facility with the senior’s needs. The growing trend is for adult communities to be specialized and in the care of seniors with memory afflictions. The communities are especially focused on creating an environment of safety and security while providing activities suitable for the maintenance and care of a senior with impaired memory.

7 stages of Alzheimer’s disease progression

According to the Alzheimer’s Association there are 7 stages of progression of Alzheimer’s disease:
Stage 1: No impairment — No evidence of memory loss but concern is indicated
Stage 2: Very mild decline — Memory lapses occur, but whether such incidences are due to the aging process or Alzheimer’s disease is unclear
Stage 3: Mild decline — Apparent decline in cognitive skills, such as remembering names and places
Stage 4: Moderate decline — Forgetfulness about one’s own personal history may occur, as well as difficulty performing daily tasks
Stage 5: Moderately severe decline — The individual starts to require help with daily activities as memory lapses begin to interfere
Stage 6: Severe decline — Personality changes begin to take place as well as confusion about one’s surroundings
Stage 7: Very severe decline — The individual loses the ability to respond to their environment, to carry on a conversation and, eventually, to control movement.